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3 edition of Nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils found in the catalog.

Nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils

Nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils

proceedings of a symposium on the nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils, Washington, DC, 1983

by

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  • 20 Currently reading

Published by M. Nijhoff in Dordrecht [Netherlands], Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rice -- Soils -- Congresses.,
  • Rice -- Fertilizers -- Congresses.,
  • Soils -- Nitrogen content -- Congresses.,
  • Nitrogen fertilizers -- Congresses.,
  • Soils, Irrigated -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies.

    Statementedited by S.K. de Datta, W.H. Patrick, Jr.
    SeriesDevelopments in plant and soil sciences ;, 26, Developments in plant and soil sciences ;, v. 26.
    ContributionsDe Datta, Surajit K., 1933-, Patrick, W. H. 1925-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsS597.R5 N58 1986
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 186 p. :
    Number of Pages186
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2715548M
    ISBN 109024733618
    LC Control Number86008592

    In samples of flooded soil containing blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), the presence of rice plants did not influence the nitrogenase activity of the algae. Nitrogenase activity of heterotrophic bacteria was enhanced by the presence of rice plants, but this activity was not affected by changes in plant density. of rice produced on silt loam soils 89% of the time. Currently, research is ongoing for rice produced on clay soils, but it appears that the proper sampling depth for clay soils will be 12 inches. Research has shown that a large amount of N can exist at depths >6 inches, and rice appears to be soil N. A key point to remember is that the proper. Rice is the second most important cereal in Ghana after maize. However, current production levels are about 47% of the country’s requirements resulting in huge annual imports of the crop. One major constraint to production has been low soil nutrients and poor nitrogen management. Nitrogen is not only a major nutrient but also most often the most limiting nutrient element in .


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Nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils Proceedings of a symposium on the Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils, Washington DC, Editors: Datta, S.K. de, Patrick, W.H. (Eds.) Free PreviewBrand: Springer Netherlands.

: Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils: Proceedings of a symposium on the Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils, Washington DC, (Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences) (): S.K. de Datta, W.H. Patrick: Books. Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils Proceedings of a symposium on the Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils, Washington DC, Editors (view affiliations) Search within book.

Front Matter. Pages i-vii. PDF. The chemistry and biology of flooded soils in relation to the nitrogen economy in rice fields. D R Bouldin. Pris: kr. Häftad, Skickas inom vardagar. Köp Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils av S K De Datta, W H Patrick på 1.

The Chemistry and Biology of Flooded Soils in Relation to the Nitrogen Economy in Rice Fields.- 2. Nitrogen Transformations in Flooded Rice Soils.- 3. Technologies for Utilizing Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Wet-Land Rice: Potentialities.

Vlek PLG, Byrnes BH and Craswell ET () Effect of urea placement on leaching losses of nitrogen from flooded rice soils. Plant Soil – CrossRef Google Scholar Bouldin D.R.

() The chemistry and biology of flooded soils in relation to the nitrogen economy in rice fields. In: De Datta S.K., Patrick W.H. (eds) Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils. Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences, vol Nitrogen enters a unique environment in flooded soils, in which losses of fertilizer N and mechanisms of losses vary greatly from those in upland situations.

Whereas upland crops frequently use 40–60% of the applied N, flooded rice crops typically use only 20–40%. Nitrogen Economy in Tropical Soils presents an authoritative and comprehensive state-of-the-art review on soil/plant nitrogen inter-relationships, with special reference to tropical soils and crops in aerobic and anaerobic environments.

Use of isotopically labelled nitrogen in experimentation, especially in tropical environments, and recently developed analytical techniques for soil. Abstract. The role of ammonia volatilization as a nitrogen loss mechanism in lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.) has recently been extensively reevaluated using techniques that do not disturb the field paper summarizes methodologies used in this research and discusses findings from recently conducted micrometeorological studies on ammonia volatilization.

An appreciable loss of labeled nitrogen occurred in flooded soils exposed to atmospheric oxygen. Nitrogen added as ammonium was apparently nitrified in the aerobic surface layer of soil and then diffused downward into the underlying anaerobic zone where it was denitrified and lost from the system.

Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils,   The applicability of microbial fuel cells (MFC) for controlling denitrification in flooded rice soils was investigated.

• The redox potentials of MFC systems were significantly higher than that of non-MFC systems, while N 2 O flux levels were lower at the same time. While the proportion of denitrified nitrogen estimated for MFC systems was %, that of non-MFC.

Effects of microplots on urea nitrogen Nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils book in flooded soils A. Trevitt, J. Freney, J. Simpson, and W. Muirhead Integrated management of green manure, farmyard manure, and inorganic nitrogen Nitrogen economy of flooded rice soils book in rice and rice-based cropping sequences O.P.

Meelu and R.A. Morris Nitrogen-sulfur interactions in rice Effect of Nitrogen Source and Management on Ammonia Volatilization Losses from Flooded Rice‐Soil Systems Contribution from the Agro‐Economic Division of the International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC), Muscle Shoals, AL J.

Legg, J. Meisinger, Soil Nitrogen Budgets, Nitrogen in Agricultural Soils, undefined, ( Nonetheless, nitrogen losses from rice soils can be dramatically reduced by keeping the soil flooded and by deep placement of the fertilizer into the reduced zone of the soil. A range of different N 2 fixing systems can contribute to the nitrogen (N) economy of flooded rice fields, but the direct evidence of N 2 fixation and the proportional contribution of heterotrophic and phototrophic N 2 fixation are difficult to assess.

Here we report on the development and application of a field-based 15 N 2 labelling technique in which a flooded rice–soil. The Chemistry and Biology of Flooded Soils in Relation to the Nitrogen Economy in Rice Fields.- 2. Nitrogen Transformations in Flooded Rice Soils.- 3.

Technologies for Utilizing Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Wet-Land Rice: Potentialities, Current Usage, and Limiting Factors.- 4. Reappraisal of the Significance of Ammonia Volatilization as. Nitrogen fertilization is a key input in increasing rice production in East, South, and Southeast Asia.

The introduction of high-yielding varieties has greatly increased the prospect of increasing yields, but this goal will not be reached without great increases in the use and efficiency of N on rice.

Nitrogen enters a unique environment in flooded soils, in which losses of fertilizer N and. Ammonia volatilization occurs naturally in both flooded and non-flooded soils. In non-flooded soils, NH 3 volatilization is of primary concern when urea fertilizer is used, because this is readily hydrolyzed by urease enzymes to NH 3 and CO 2 resulting in an increase in soil pH and NH 4 + around the fertilizer granule (Francis et al., ).

Direct‐seeded flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.) culture is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to transplanting in some regions of field studies were therefore conducted to compare the growth patterns of wet‐row‐seeded and transplanted ‘IR64’ rice as affected by rate of N fertilizer application (0 and 90 kg N ha −1 in and 0, 30, 60, 90,and kg N ha.

O ne of the most important management decisions for delayed‐flood rice production in the midsouthern United States is N fertilization strategy. Recommendations for N fertilizer in both Louisiana and Mississippi vary by cultivar and soil texture, but both states generally recommend the majority of N (– kg N ha −1) be applied preflood with the remainder (34–67 kg N ha.

1. Introduction [2] Rice is harvested annually on million hectares of the land worldwide and provides the basic food for nearly half of the people on the Earth [International Rice Research Institute, ].However, the productivity of rice soils is declining due to intensive cultivation and use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides [Cassmann et al., ], and the.

Nitrogen is the nutrient element, limiting the growth of rice in many rice soils. Also, the interest in flooded rice soil ecosystems and its nitrogen transformations are derived from the fact that.

Adequate nitrogen (N) availability is a major constraint to rice production throughout the world. Nitrogen is the nutrient which potentially may be lost in substantial quantities from the ecosystem by volatilization, denitrification, and leaching.

Flooded soils are uniquely different from upland soils due to their complex chemical, physico-chemical, and biological reactions acting over. Straw-amended soils were treated with 15N-labelled (NH4)2SO4 or urea solution and incubated at 25°C.

Immobilization of N in flooded soil was 8 intermediate between that under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Added N immobilized per unit weight of straw varied with the amount and N content of the straw and with the nature of the soluble N applied; in flooded soil, rice straw of.

(). Nitrogen transformations and loss in flooded soils and sediments. C R C Critical Reviews in Environmental Control: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. Get this from a library. Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils: Proceedings of a symposium on the Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils, Washington DC, [S K Datta; W H Patrick] -- The steadily increasing cost of nitrogen fertilizer has resulted in more emphasis on basic and applied studies to improve nitrogen use efficiency in lowland rice.

Effect of Rice Plants on Nitrogenase Activity of Flooded Soils Article (PDF Available) in Applied and Environmental Microbiology 40(3) October. By Bruce Linquist, Department of Plant Sciences, UC Davis Rain in May, especially in the amounts we have seen this year, is far from ideal for rice growers.

It makes establishing seedlings, nitrogen (N) management, and weed control extra challenging. Rain in May is not new. In,andaverage May rainfall in the Sacramento Valley was. The importance of ammonia volatilization after urea application to flooded rice (Oryza sativa L.) was assessed in six experiments at two field locations in the Philippines, using a nondisturbing micrometeorological r studies had produced conflicting results probably because the techniques used did not conserve the balance of physical, chemical, and biological.

Some lowland rice is also grown on nonpuddled soils, but in these produc-tion systems the soil is typically submerged at least part of the time. One method of rice crop establishment, including in the USA, is to sow germinated seeds onto nonpuddled, saturated, or fl ooded soil.

In such case, the rice fi eld is irrigated and. Historically high N prices have increased farmer interest in economic optimum N rates for rice (Oryza sativa L.).This study uses five to 8 yr of rice variety by N data from four research locations in Arkansas varying by soil series [Perry clay (Vertic Haplaquepts); Sharkey clay (Vertic Haplaquepts); DeWitt silt loam (Typic Albaqualfs); and Hillemann silt loam (Thermic, Albic.

Witt, S.M. Haefele, in Encyclopedia of Soils in the Environment, Introduction. Wetland rice or paddy soils provide the staple diet for nearly half the world's population.

Worldwide, the total harvested rice area covers approximately million hectares, and approximately 90% of this rice area is situated in Asia, with a similar share in rice production. Title: Nitrogen economy of irrigated rice: field and simulation studies: proceedings of the 'International workshop on nitrogen management and modelling in irrigated rice', held at the Crop Experiment Station, Rural Development Administration, Suweon, Korea, 1 - 10 November 1.

The chemistry and biology of flooded soils in relation to the nitrogen economy in rice fields D.R. BOULDIN 1 2. Nitrogen transformations in flooded rice soils D.R. KEENEY and K.L. SAHRAWAT 15 3. Technologies for utilizing biological nitrogen fixation in wet-land rice: potentialities, current usage, and limiting factors P.A.

ROGERS and I. To understand how nitrogen can be lost from a rice field, one must recognize that nitrogen management in rice is much more difficult than in upland crops, such as soybeans or corn. The principal reason is that rice fields remain flooded for extended periods of time creating an anaerobic – without oxygen – soil condition.

Contribution of organic materials to nitrogen economy in rice (Oryza sativa Book. Jan ; R.P. Agrawal Rice is the only cereal crop that finds its optimal environment under flooded soil. Biological nitrogen fixation in flooded rice fields.

[Henry S Lowendorf; New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Nitrogen -- Fixation.

# Rice--Soils\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema. Residual Fertilizer Nitrogen in a Flooded Rice Soil1 K. REDDY AND W. PATRICK, JR. 2 ABSTRACT in the soil-water-plant system was measured. Approxi-Residual effects of 15N-labelled fertilizer (ammonium sulfate) ni-mately O^-half to two-thirds of the applied N was.

Nitrogen Economy of Flooded Rice Soils. Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff; pp. – 5. Dobermann A, Witt C, Dawe D, Abdulrachman S, Gines HC, Nagarajan R, Satawathananont S, Son TT, Tan PS, Wang GH, et al.

Site-specific nutrient management for intensive rice cropping systems in Asia. soil loss via oxidation. Based on the soil health index, rice cultivation and flooded-fallow improved overall soil quality compared to fallow lands. Keywords: flooded-fallow, rice cultivation, histosols, soil health, active carbon 1.

Introduction Rational & Justification Soil health is a term synonymous with soil quality. Get this from a library! Nitrogen Economy in Tropical Soils: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Nitrogen Economy in Tropical Soils, held in Trinidad, W.I., January[N Ahmad] -- Nitrogen Economy in Tropical Soils presents an authoritative and comprehensive state-of-the-art review on soil/plant nitrogen inter-relationships, with special reference to tropical soils .Rice Nitrogen Management- Rates and Timing of Urea Fertilizer Gene Stevens and David Dunn University of Missouri-Delta Research Center Managing nitrogen fertilization in rice fields can be challenging for producers.

Because ammonium nitrate is subject to denitrification on flooded soils, urea is the main N source for rice.